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The stoa-like portico, preserved in good condition, reveals a high level of workmanship characteristic of this otherwise relatively modest house. The post-and-lintel system, typical of most Syrian constructions of this type, employs certain standard classical conventions. Thus, bulkier, more stylized columns on the first floor are reminiscent of the Doric Order while the corresponding superimposed columns on the second floor reveal clear affinities with the Ionic Order. The method of superimposition is recognizably related to the principles established in classical architecture. Miniature arches that disrupt the horizontal architrave molding at midpoints of each span and a cross in a roundel in the middle span bespeak regional variations in the use of classical vocabulary, as well as Christian ownership.
The relatively well-preserved façade of the main wing of this house is marked by the boldness of the overall design and details. The stark forms of the two towers flanking the façade are linked by an equally stark two-storied portico. Unlike the portico of House III, the columns of this portico are devoid of any associations with classical prototypes reduced as they are to bold, purely geometric forms. The use of massive ashlar blocks betrays the same boldness of expression that more readily recalls architecture of ancient Egypt rather than that of the Romans.
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