Polis Chrysochous ∑ Cyprus ∑ Twenty Years of Excavation

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Excavations began here in 1984, at the time right next to the excavation house which has been removed since. The houseís former location can be judged by the grape-arbor at the top left, which served as the teamís dining room.

In the foreground is a Byzantine church (partially obscured by the two trees) along the north edge of which are a series of charnel pits. On the left of the photograph a series of rooms form an olive press, commonly associated with churches in Cyprus. In the middle ground is a large concrete floor of a colonnaded courtyard. It belongs to a Roman building from the early imperial period. This was built on a sandy fill that covered massive ashlar and mudbrick walls of the fourth century B.C., visible just beyond the courtyard on the left. These walls probably formed part of the city defenses of the fourth century B.C. They were built over structures of the fifth and sixth centuries B.C., which stretch out to the right, and one of which was a small sanctuary. In the middle ground, on the right, is a jumble of Roman walls, overlaid with a broad wall that forms a rectangle, which probably was a tower of the Byzantine fortifications.