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Home | Workplace Safety | Laboratory Safety | Radiation Safety | Biological Safety | Emergencies
 
Listings of Programs & Services


Decriptions of Programs & Services


 

Services and Programs

Listings of Programs and Services
EHS provides the following programs and services. Click on a title to see a description of that program or service:


Workplace Safety Programs

Chemical and Laboratory Safety Programs

Radiation Safety Programs

Biological Safety and Sanitation Programs


Descriptions of Programs & Services

Workplace Safety

Accident Investigation
Accidents occur when hazards escape detection during preventive measures, such as a job or process safety analysis, when hazards are not obvious, or as the result of combinations of circumstances that were difficult to foresee. A thorough accident investigation may identify previously overlooked physical, environmental, or process hazards, the need for new or more extensive safety training, or unsafe work practices. All accidents should be investigated. The depth and complexity of the investigation will vary with the circumstances and seriousness of the accident.

The Safety Engineer offers consultation, assistance, and training in conducting accident investigations. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section A2, Accident Investigation Procedure.

Contacts:
1. General Information – Greg Cantrell at 258-5849

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Asbestos
Asbestos was added to a variety of building materials, including some acoustical materials, vinyl floor tiles, ceiling tiles, decorative spray coatings, thermal system insulation, and roofing materials. Such building materials installed prior to 1980 are presumed to contain asbestos unless testing proves otherwise. When left intact and undisturbed, these materials do not pose a health risk to building occupants.

EHS offers services for identifying asbestos-containing materials prior to construction activities which may disturb asbestos, air sampling in areas where friable (easily crumbled by hand pressure) asbestos is known to exist, and personal and area air sampling where there is a potential for exposure exists. We also offer Asbestos Awareness Training for employees who may come in contact with asbestos- containing materials as part of their job (e.g., maintenance workers, Building Services employees, etc.). For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B12, Asbestos in University Buildings.

Contacts:
1. Asbestos identification, surveillance, project monitoring –Joan Hutzly at 258-6251, Robin Izzo at 258-6259, or Garth Walters at 258-6258
2. Asbestos Awareness Training - Robin Izzo, 258-6259

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Back Care and Material Handling
Back pain and injuries related to lifting and material handling are some of the most frequent types of injuries, both on and off the job. While some factors that contribute to the potential for injury cannot be controlled, others can be reduced or minimized. Poor physical fitness, obesity, smoking, poor posture, and medical/physical deficiencies are personal factors that may contribute to back pain. Workplace factors may include inadequate workplace design, improper or defective material handling equipment, improper manual or mechanical handling methods, and inadequate training. Investing time in an effective Back Care Program yields improved productivity, morale, and reduces potential lost work time due to injury.

EHS offers services for identifying and evaluating material handling hazards, selection of materials handling equipment, and employee training. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section A7, Back Care Program.

Contacts:
1. General Information - Greg Cantrell at 258-5849

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Computer Workstations
Individuals who use computers for extended periods of time may experience eye fatigue and pain or discomfort in the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, neck or back. This is usually caused by poor work habits, poor work station design or improper use of computer workstation components. In most cases, corrective measures are relatively simple and inexpensive.

EHS offers services for evaluating computer workstations, providing guidance on workstation setup and accessories, and employee training. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section A4, Computer Workstations.

Contact:
1. General Information - Kelly States at 258-2648

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Confined Spaces
Confined spaces are areas that are large enough to enter, have a restricted means of entry or egress, and are not designed for continuous occupancy. Examples of confined spaces include boilers, manholes, pits, and sewers. Entry into confined spaces must be done in accordance with the federal OSHA Confined Space standard.

The Safety Engineer offers services for identifying and evaluating confined spaces, selecting appropriate protective materials and equipment, developing required written programs and procedures, and employee training. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B9, Confined Space Entry.

Contact:
1. General information - Kelly States at 258-2648 or Greg Cantrell at 258-5849

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Construction Safety
Construction can be defined as "work for construction, alteration, and/or repair, including painting and decorating." Examples of activities that could be classified as construction include building renovations, excavation and trenching operations, painting, masonry, and certain activities associated with building systems such as HVAC, plumbing, and electrical supply.

Construction and renovation activities might be performed by either outside contractors or University workers. Projects may be done exclusively by one group or the other, or may be a collaborative effort. Because of these differing arrangements, it often is unclear who is responsible for a given situation, or who has the authority to ensure that safety and health regulations are followed.

EHS offers services and training for identifying and evaluating construction safety issues. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B11, Construction and Renovations, or Section B14, Projects Affecting Critical Services in Science and Engineering Buildings. Project Managers might find the Safety Guide for Project Managers useful as well.

Contact:
1. General Information – Greg Cantrell at 258-5849

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Cutting and Welding Safety
Cutting and welding operations (commonly referred to as hot work) are associated with machine shops, maintenance, and construction activities, as well as certain laboratory-related activities, such as glass blowing and torch soldering. Potential health, safety, and property hazards result from the fumes, gases, sparks, hot metal and radiant energy produced during hot work. Hot work equipment, which may produce high voltages or utilize compressed gases, also requires special awareness and training on the part of the worker to be used safely.

EHS offers services for identifying and evaluating hazards associated with cutting and welding. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B10, Cutting and Welding (Hot Work) Operations.

Contacts:
1. General Information – Greg Cantrell at 258-5849
2. Exposure Monitoring - Robin Izzo at 258-6259
3. Respiratory Protection questions – Robin Izzo at 258-6259

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Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices
Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices are intended to protect employees from the hazards of working on or near exposed electrical circuits through training, procedures such as lockout/tagout, and the use of appropriate personal protective equipment. Occupations typically affected include electrical and electronic engineers and technicians, electricians, mechanics, painters, riggers, welders, and industrial machine operators.

EHS offers services for identifying and evaluating electrical hazards, selection of personal protective equipment, and employee training. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B2, Electrical Safety Related Work Practices.

Contact:
1. General information - Greg Cantrell at 258-5849

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Fall Protection
When work is performed on elevated surfaces such as roofs, or during construction activities, protection against falls frequently must be considered. Fall arresting systems, which include lifelines, body harnesses, and other associated equipment, are often used when fall hazards cannot be controlled by railings, floors, nets, and other means. These systems are designed to stop a free fall of up to six feet while limiting the forces imposed on the wearer.

EHS offers services for identifying and evaluating fall protection issues, and training in using fall protection systems. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B7, Fall Protection.

Contact:
1. General Information and Training – Greg Cantrell at 258-5849

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Forklift Safety (Powered Industrial Trucks)
A powered industrial truck is any mobile, power-propelled truck used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack, or tier materials. More commonly known as forklifts, pallet trucks, rider trucks, fork trucks, or lift trucks, they can be ridden or controlled by a walking operator. Powered industrial trucks can have electric or combustion engines and can be designed for a wide variety of applications.

EHS offers training in powered industrial truck safety, as well as services for identifying or evaluating forklift safety issues.

Contact:
1. General Information and Training – Kelly States at 258-2648

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Hoisting and Rigging Safety

The ability to safely move materials from one location to another is a vital part of many activities at Princeton. Hoists are often used when materials are too heavy or bulky to be safely moved manually. Because hoists rely upon slings to hold their suspended loads, slings are the most commonly used materials-handling apparatus.

In part because of the complex nature of the seemingly simple task of lifting an object, an effective program is necessary to lift and move heavy loads safely. EHS provides services for the identification and evaluation of hoisting and lifting operations and provides training. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B15, Hoisting and Rigging Safety.

Contact:
1. General Information – Greg Cantrell at 258-5849

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Indoor Air Quality
Poor indoor air quality can create unhealthy conditions for individuals exposed to such environments. There can be true indoor air quality hazards when there are such things as chemical spills or leaks, mold and mildew from damp or water-damaged fixtures, conditions of heavy dust, and inadequate or malfunctioning ventilation. There are also a multitude of symptoms and allergic reactions that have been suggested to result from poor indoor air quality that may or may not be related. Addressing indoor air quality issues is not an exact science, and it can be difficult, if not impossible, to identify what an individual perceives as affecting them in their indoor environment. The investigation of indoor air quality situations is most often based on finding visual conditions or mechanical malfunctions that are creating a potential hazard.

EHS provides investigation and response services to indoor air quality concerns and odors that develop indoors.

Contacts:
1. General information or indoor air concern – Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427
2. Ventilation malfunction or inadequacy – Grounds and Building Maintenance 258-3423

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Ladder Safety
Portable ladders are used in a wide variety of settings, both academic and administrative. Misuse of portable ladders can result in serious injuries from falls or, in the case of metal ladders, electrical shock. Portable ladders must be maintained in good condition at all times, and inspected at regular, frequent intervals. Training is also an important aspect of portable ladder safety and accident prevention.

EHS provides training and services related to the safe use of ladders. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B8, Portable Ladder Safety, or the Portable Ladder Advisory.

Contact:
1. General Information – Greg Cantrell at 258-5849 or Kelly States at 258-2648

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Lead Paint
Exposure to lead in the environment can result from exposure to sources such as lead-based paint, water, soil, and industrial sources. Lead enters the body through ingestion of paint chips, paint dust, contaminated soil, or water or through inhalation of lead dust. The most common source of exposure is likely to be from leaded paint or dust in those cases where the paint is in poor condition, the dust is created by construction or maintenance activities, or where painted surfaces rub against each other under normal use, such as with casement windows. Those at greatest risk from such exposures are children six years old and younger and pregnant women. Because leaded paint has not been used for many years in University facilities, only old paint under several layers that is exposed through poor conditions or activities noted above is a potential exposure hazard.

EHS provides review and consultation regarding potential lead exposure conditions and can be consulted when there is a lead paint concern.

Contacts:

1. General information or exposure concern –Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427
2. Information on lead paint in housing units – Housing at 258-3127

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Lockout/Tagout
Lockout/tagout procedures are intended to prevent the unexpected startup of machines or equipment during servicing or maintenance. Hazardous energy sources are controlled as employees follow procedures requiring the application of a lockout/tagout device, in accordance with the federal OSHA Lockout/Tagout standard.

EHS offers services for identifying machines or equipment where lockout/tagout must be used, developing required written programs and procedures, and employee training. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B3, Lockout/Tagout.

Contact:
1. General information - Greg Cantrell at 258-5849 or Kelly States at 258-2648

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Noise and Hearing Conservation
Exposure to loud and prolonged noise can damage hearing. Employees who are exposed to a time weighted average (sound levels averaged over an 8 hour day) of 85 decibels (dB) or more must be included in the Princeton University Hearing Conservation Program, in accordance with the federal OSHA Noise Standard. Employees in this program must attend training and have their hearing tested by Occupational Medicine annually. Periodic noise monitoring of noise-producing equipment and personal exposure is performed by EHS. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B5, Noise and Hearing Conservation.

There are noise sources at the University which do not pose a health hazard, but are nonetheless a source of annoyance. While EHS may take measurements or provide other consultative services in these instances, it is not the purpose of the Hearing Conservation Program to deal with such situations.

Contacts:
1. Noise measurements, training, and general questions – Robin Izzo, 258-6259
2. Hearing testing - Occupational Medicine, 258-5035

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Personal Protective Equipment
Personal protective equipment (PPE) includes all types of equipment used to increase individual safety while performing potentially hazardous tasks. The may include safety glasses, hard hats, gloves, lab coats, respirators, or any equipment used to protect against injury or illness.

EHS offers services for the evaluation of potential workplace hazards, selection of personal protective equipment, and employee training. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section B4, Personal Protective Equipment.

Contact:
General information - Greg Cantrell at 258-5849 or Kelly States at 258-2648
Respirators – Joan Hutzly at 258-6251

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Scaffolding Safety
A scaffold is any temporary elevated or suspended work platform, and its supporting structure, used for supporting workers and/or materials. These fall into two broad categories, supported scaffolds and suspension scaffolds, and often find wide use during construction and renovation projects. Frequently, issues such as the scaffolds construction and use, fall protection, and the protection of other from falling objects, must be considered.

EHS provides services for the identification and evaluation of safety issues surrounding the use of scaffolds, and provides basic scaffolding safety training.

Contact:
1. General Information – Greg Cantrell at 258-5849

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Chemical and Laboratory Safety

Chemical Waste Disposal
EHS administers the program to manage and dispose of wastes contaminated with hazardous materials. For more detailed information, refer to the EHS Hazardous Waste Disposal page, the EHS Radioactive Waste Disposal page or the University Health and Safety Guide, Section C6, Chemical Waste Disposal.

Contacts:
1. General Information - Steve Elwood at 258-6271 or Robin Izzo at 258-6259

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Hazard Communication Program
The purpose of the Hazard Communication Program is to ensure all University employees are informed about the identity and hazards of the chemicals in their workplace and how to handle these chemicals safely. This program applies to staff working in any area except laboratories. Laboratory workers should refer to the Laboratory Safety Program.

Each department is responsible for developing its own Hazard Communication Program administered by the Departmental Safety Manager. The program includes provisions for assuring chemicals are properly labeled as to their constituents and hazards, obtaining and making available material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for all hazardous materials, developing a written Hazard Communication Program, and assuring all employees have received appropriate training. For more detailed information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section C2, Hazard Communication.

See your departmental written program or the text of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard for additional information.

Contacts:
1. General Information or Training – Robin Izzo at 258-6259
2. Department Specific Information - See your Departmental Safety Manager

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High School Students & Minors in the Lab
Individuals under the age of 18 are subject to many restrictions on work in a laboratory. Prior to hiring or inviting an underage person, the PI must complete and submit a proposal for approval by EHS.

Contacts:
1. General Information - Brandon Chance at 258-7882

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Laboratory Fume Hood Surveys
One of the primary safety devices in chemical laboratories is the fume hood. A well-designed fume hood, when properly installed and maintained, can provide a substantial degree of protection for the experimenter, provided proper use and limitations are understood. Consult your departmental Chemical Hygiene Plan for more information regarding fume hood use, operation, maintenance, etc. EHS surveys each fume hood annually. Hood users planning to work with a particularly hazardous material or, for other reasons, desiring assistance in evaluating the suitability of a fume hood for a particular use may consult with EHS.

Contacts:
1. General Information - Robin Izzo at 258-6259 or Joan Hutzly at 258-6251
2. Hood survey - Joan Hutzly at 258-6251

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Laboratory Safety
The purpose of the Laboratory Safety Program is to ensure that laboratory workers are informed about the hazards of chemicals in their workplace and that they are protected from any chemical exposures that exceed allowable levels. The standard applies to all science and engineering laboratories at Princeton University.

Each department has appointed a Chemical Hygiene Officer responsible for developing and implementing a Chemical Hygiene Plan. The written Plan must be reviewed and updated annually. For more information, see the text of the OSHA Laboratory Standard or your departmental Chemical Hygiene Plan. See also the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section C3, Laboratory Standard and the Laboratory Safety Manual.

Contacts:
1. General Information - Robin Izzo at 258-6259 or Kelly States at 258-2648
2. Department Specific Information - Your Departmental Chemical Hygiene Officer

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Laser Safety
The Laser Safety program applies to anyone using Class 3 or 4 lasers, except laser pointers. Medium and high powered lasers are capable of causing eye or skin injury or fire, and may pose hazards from high voltage, high pressure, hazardous chemicals or radiation.

EHS provides Laser Safety Training to all laser users and, upon request, conducts inspections and provides advice about selection of eye protection, setting up a laser, and other laser safety information. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section E3, Laser Safety.

Contacts:
1. General information and training – Steve Elwood at 258-6271 or Robin Izzo at 258-6259
2. Eye examinations – Employee Health, McCosh Health Center, 258-5035

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Respiratory Protection
The use of respirators at Princeton University is subject to prior review and approval by EHS, per University policy. Anyone who believes that respiratory protection is needed during the course of his or her work must notify EHS. EHS will evaluate the potential hazards of the work and determine if respiratory protection is necessary. Employees who require respiratory protection will be enrolled in the Respiratory Protection Program, which includes respirator selection, training and fit-testing, and medical assessment of employee health, as required by the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section C4, Respiratory Protection.

Contacts:
1. Respiratory protection evaluation – Robin Izzo at 258-6259
2. Training and Fit-Testing - Joan Hutzly at 258-6251
3. Medical Exams – Employee Health, McCosh Health Center at 258-5035

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Shipping Hazardous Materials
Hazardous materials must be shipped or transported in accordance with state, federal or international transportation regulations. EHS provides assistance to ensure that hazardous materials are packaged and shipped to meet all regulatory requirements. A request to ship hazardous materials can be submitted to EHS by completing the Shipping Hazardous Materials Form.

Contacts:
1. General information – Steve Elwood at 258-6271

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Radiation Safety Training

Radioisotope Acquisition and Authorization
For more information, see the Radiation Safety: Radioisotope Purchases page, the Radiation Safety: Authorizations page or the Radiation Safety Manual for Laboratory Workers, Section 3.

Contacts:
1. General information – Sue Dupre at 258-6252

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Radiation Monitoring Badges and Bioassays
For more information, see the Radiation Safety: Radiation Monitoring Badges page or the Radiation Safety Manual for Laboratory Workers, Section 6.

Contacts:
1. General information– Sue Dupre at 258-6252

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Laboratory Survey Meters - registration, calibration, maintenance, use
For more information, see the Radiation Safety Manual for Laboratory Workers, Section 5.

Contacts:
1. General information – Steve Elwood at 258-6271


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Non-Ionizing Radiation (microwave, radiofrequency, electromagnetic)
For more information, see the Health and Safety Guide, Section E5, Electromagnetic Fields.

Contacts:
1. General information – Sue Dupre at 258-6252

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Prenatal Counseling for Radiation Workers
For more information, see the Radiation Safety Manual for Laboratory Workers, Section 6.

Contacts:
1. General information – Sue Dupre at 258-6252


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Radiation-Producing Equipment
For more information, see the Radiation Safety: X-Ray Machines page or the Radiation Safety Manual for Laboratory Workers, Section 9.

Contacts:
1. General information – Sue Dupre at 258-6252

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Radiation Surveys
For more information about performing surveys, see the Radiation Safety Manual for Laboratory Workers, Section 5. EHS is responsible for performing routine laboratory contamination and radiation level surveys, pre-maintenance surveys on equipment and facilities in which radioactive materials have been used, decommissioning surveys in radioisotope areas in which radioactive materials will no longer be used or which have been vacated, and a variety of other special surveys.

Contacts:
1. General information – Sue Dupre at 258-6252
2. To request a survey - Sue Dupre at 258-6252 or Steve Elwood at 258-6271

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Radioactive Material Transportation
Radioactive materials must be shipped or transported in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements and state, federal or international transportation regulations. EHS provides assistance to ensure that radioactive materials are shipped to licensed institutions and authorized individuals and that radioactive material packages and shipments meet all regulatory requirements. For more detailed information, see the Radiation Safety: Shipping Radioactive Materials page or the Radiation Safety Manual for Laboratory Workers, Section 8. A request to ship radioactive materials can be submitted to EHS by completing the Shipping Hazardous Materials Form.

Contacts:
1. General information – Steve Elwood at 258-6271 or Sue Dupre at 258-6252

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Radioactive Waste
For more information, see the Radiation Safety: Waste Disposal page or the Radiation Safety Manual for Laboratory Workers, Section 7.

Contacts:
1. General information – Steve Elwood at 258-6271

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Ultra-Violet Light Safety
For more information, see the Health and Safety Guide, Section E4, Ultraviolet Light Safety.

Contacts:
1. General information – Sue Dupre at 258-6252

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Biological Safety and Sanitation Programs

Bloodborne Pathogens

Exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials can pose a risk of infection with bloodborne pathogens like Hepatitis B and HIV viruses. For any employee who can reasonably be expected to have such exposure as part of their job responsibilities, it is required that they be given the appropriate training and offered the Hepatitis B vaccination.

Training is provided through an on-line interactive web-based program, Protection Against Bloodborne Pathogen, that concludes with the offer of Hepatitis B vaccination and registration in the Bloodborne Pathogens Program.

EHS also provides assistance to departments with potentially exposed employees in developing their Exposure Control Plan as part of this Bloodborne Pathogens Program. For more detailed information, see the Health and Safety Guide, Section D1, Bloodborne Pathogens.
Contacts:
Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427

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Foodborne Illness
Foodborne illness can happen if food is mishandled or contaminated and is subsequently consumed by those who are susceptible. The typical symptoms are gastroenteric, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach cramps. Keep in mind that:

  • similar symptoms can be the result of a variety of viral and flu-like illnesses.
  • foodborne illness symptoms do not always appear shortly after eating a suspect food; illness may not be experienced for as long as 72 hours after eating.
  • groups or large numbers of individuals usually consume foods available from campus sources; one or two illnesses identified following consumption do not suggest illness from that food source.

However, it is important that illnesses suspected of being associated with a common campus source be reported to EHS.

EHS provides review and investigation services for any reported illnesses suspected to be from campus food sources and, as appropriate, works with local and State health department officials when foodborne illness is identified.

Contact:
1. General information or illness reporting – Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427
2. Medical Care - McCosh Health Center at 258-3141 during business hours or 258-3139 after hours


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Food Protection
The Food Protection Program is intended to ensure that sanitary practices and procedures are in place and being followed for food handling activities. This program supports the service of wholesome and safe foods to the campus community and addresses the regulatory requirements of the State food codes.

EHS provides inspection, consultation, and training services for management, staff and students involved in food receiving, storage, preparation, and service. EHS participates in plan review for new and renovated food service facilities and investigates any reports of suspected foodborne illness. An approval procedure is in place through Risk Management for acceptance of outside caterers to provide food service on campus. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section A11, Food Protection.

Contacts:
1. General Information – Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427
2. Caterer ApprovalRisk Management at 258 3349 or 258-3078

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Insect and Rodent Control
Management of insect, rodent, and animal pests on campus is intended to prevent the potential for injury, illness, or property damage that these pests can cause.

An outside firm is contracted to provide the general insect and rodent control services on campus. They provide monthly or more frequent service to many University buildings to reduce or eliminate pest activity through inspection, monitoring, and other abatement measures. Grounds and Building Maintenance responds to animal control situations directly or with the cooperation of the local animal control officer. EHS monitors the pest control program, investigates unresolved pest control issues, and recommends appropriate solutions to pest control situations. For more information, see the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section A10, Pest Management.

Contacts:
1. General information and unresolved pest control problems – Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427
2. Pest control service – Building Services at 258-3490
3. Animal control – Grounds and Building Maintenance at 258-3423
4. Emergency animal control situations – Public Safety at 911

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Live Virus Worker Program
This program applies to persons who are working in the laboratory with live viruses that are potentially infectious to humans. It is important that the persons be fully informed of and accept the associated risks, follow appropriate safety measures, and receive appropriate medical surveillance. The Live Virus Worker Program provides a process by which the virus worker can readily accomplish this.

For more information, see the Biosafety Manual, Section II.C in the Biological Safety web site. See also the Princeton University Health and Safety Guide, Section D3, Live Virus Worker Program.

Contacts:
1. Information on Live Virus Worker Program - Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427
2. Medical Surveillance – Employee Health at 258-5035

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Medical Waste and Sharps Disposal
Procedures have been developed for the proper handling and disposal of medical waste (biologically-contaminated materials) and sharps (i.e., needles/syringes, glass pipettes), and these procedures are posted in each laboratory that generates these types of waste. For more information, see the Biosafety Manual, Section IV.F.

Contacts:
1. General information - Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427

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Swimming Pool Sanitation
The maintenance of good swimming pool sanitation and water quality is essential for the health and safety of those using Dillon and DeNunzio pool facilities. It is important that facilities be maintained clean, provide healthy, safe, and monitored water chemistry, have the required safety equipment provided and readily accessible, and ensure the necessary supervision and lifeguard coverage. In meeting these parameters, University pool facilities also comply with the requirements of the State Public Recreational Bathing Code.

The Sanitarian provides inspection, consultation, and monitoring services for the pool operations and works closely with the local health department and the pool management staff to ensure compliance with State and local pool codes.

Contacts:
1. General information – Jacqueline Wagner at 258-1427
2. Pool operation – Bruce Carney at 258-1801

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