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2014-15 Visiting Fellows and Postdoctoral Research Associates


Dominic Burbidge, 2014-15 Postdoctoral Research Associate, received his Doctorate of Philosophy in Politics from Oriel College, University of Oxford in July 2014. His dissertation was on Trust and Social Capital in Urban Kenya and Tanzania. At Oriel College, he received the Frankel Studentship in Political Economy, and researched trust and social capital, taking as case studies urban Kenya and Tanzania. He completed a BSc at the University of London in Politics and Economics and a Masters in Comparative Government at St. Antony's College, University of Oxford. At St. Antony's he was awarded the title Dahrendorf Scholar for research into free speech, and acted as head researcher to Professor Timothy Garton Ash. He worked for two years for the UK Parliament. He has co-edited Governance Challenges in East Africa with Dr. Antoinette Kankindi and Dr. Tom Odhiambo, and published in various academic journals on politics and trust. He was Academic Assistant to Dr. Richard Ekins of St John's College, University of Oxford, and has lectured in public policy at Strathmore University, Kenya. For Strathmore University, he helped found Utawala, a research support project in service of Kenya's governors.

Kody W. Cooper, 2014-15 Postdoctoral Research Associate, graduated summa cum laude from Kansas State University in 2006 with BA degrees in Political Science and Spanish. He also spent one semester studying Spanish and International Relations in Sevilla, Spain. He received his MA in Government at the University of Texas at Austin in 2010 and expects to receive his PhD in Government at UT in 2014. In 2009-2010 he was a Visiting Scholar at Wolfson College, Cambridge University and was a Lecturer at Texas State University in 2013-14.


Jesse D. Covington, 2014-15 William E. Simon Fellow in Religion and Public Life, is Associate Professor of Political Science at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA, where he teaches and writes in the fields of political theory and constitutional law. His research interests focus on the First Amendment, political theology, and the foundations of political liberalism. He recently co-edited Natural Law and Evangelical Political Thought, to which he contributed a chapter on St. Augustine and natural law. As a visiting fellow with the James Madison Program, he will be working on a manuscript provisionally titled Taken on Faith: The Concept of Religion in First Amendment Jurisprudence. He is also engaged in an ongoing collaborative project on evangelical political thought. He earned an MA and PhD in Political Science from the University of Notre Dame and an MAR in Religion at Westminster Theological Seminary.


Aurelian Craiutu, 2014-15 Ann and Herbert W. Vaughan Visiting Fellow, is Professor of Political Science at Indiana University, Bloomington. He has published extensively in the field of modern French political thought from Montesquieu to Raymond Aron. Professor Craiutu’s recent publications include Tocqueville on America after 1840 (Cambridge University Press, 2009; with Jeremy Jennings), America through European Eyes (Penn State University Press, 2009, with Jeffrey C. Isaac), Conversations with Tocqueville (with Sheldon Gellar, Lexington Books, 2009), and a newly revised English edition of Madame de Staël’s Considerations on the Principal Events of the French Revolution (Liberty Fund, 2008). His latest book, A Virtue for Courageous Minds: Moderation in French Political Thought, 1748-1830, was published by Princeton University Press in 2012. In 2014-15, he will be working on a new book manuscript, Political Moderation in the Age of Extremes (under contract with University of Pennsylvania Press). He received his BA with honors in Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies in Bucharest, Romania, and a MA and a PhD in Politics from Princeton University. He was awarded the APSA’s Leo Strauss Award for best dissertation in Political Philosophy.


Christopher Kaczor, 2014-15 William E. Simon Fellow in Religion and Public Life, is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University. He is the author of The Seven Big Myths about Marriage, A Defense of Dignity, The Seven Big Myths about the Catholic Church, The Ethics of Abortion, Thomas Aquinas on the Cardinal Virtues, and Proportionalism and the Natural Law Tradition. Professor Kaczor's research on issues of ethics, philosophy, and religion has been in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, BBC, ABC, NBC, FOX, CBS, MSNBC, and the Today Show. An undergraduate at Boston College, he earned a PhD four years later from the University of Notre Dame. He then did postdoctoral work in Germany as von Humbolt Federal Chancellor Fellow and returned to Germany as a Fulbright Scholar.


Robert C. Koons, 2014-15 Visiting Fellow, is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin, where he has taught since 1987. He specializes in metaphysics, social and political philosophy, and philosophy of religion. He is the author of two books, Paradoxes of Belief and Realism Regained, and the co-editor of The Waning of Materialism (Oxford University Press, 2010). He has written over thirty articles. He was elected in 2009 as a Senator-at-Large of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. He earned a BA in philosophy at Michigan State, a BA with First Class Honours in Philosophy & Theology at Oxford, and a PhD at UCLA.


Earl Maltz, 2014-15 Garwood Visiting Fellow, is a Distinguished Professor of Law at Rutgers University School of Law in Camden, NJ, where he has been a member of the faculty for over 30 years.  He is the author of eight books and many articles on constitutional law and constitutional history, and has served as senior content consultant for the National Constitution Center. Maltz received his BA with highest distinction from Northwestern University in 1972 and his JD cum laude in 1975 from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review.


James M. Patterson, 2014-15 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate, attended the University of Houston as an undergraduate, where in 2002 he received a BA in Political Science and Media Studies. In 2012 He received his PhD in Politics from the University of Virginia. His dissertation examined how Bishop Fulton Sheen, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and Rev. Jerry Falwell each used mass media strategies to persuade Americans of their respective religious foundations for America and the public policies these foundations required. His most recent work, “The American Nehemiad, or a Tale of Two Walls,” will appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Church & State. He was a Visiting Fellow in the Program of American Values and Institutions at Duke University in 2012-13 and a Visiting Assistant Professor of Government and Foreign Affairs at Hampden-Sydney College in 2013-14.


Veronica Roberts, 2014-15 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate, received her Doctorate of Philosophy in Political Science from the University of Notre Dame in August 2014. Her dissertation, Romanitas Recast: Augustine's Reeducation of the Romans Against Idoltry and Towards Good Citizenship, explores Augustine’s moral psychology, arguing that the City of God provides a helpful framework for concerned citizens to understand the dynamics that destroy political community in any age. Before coming to Notre Dame, Roberts received a BA in philosophy and political science and an MA in philosophy from Boston College. In addition to her interest in political philosophy, she is interested in constitutional studies, viewing the theme of good citizenship as a cross-section between the two subfields.


Charles T. Rubin, 2014-15 Garwood Visiting Professor and Visiting Fellow, is Associate Professor of Political Science in the McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts at Duquesne University. Prior to teaching at Duquesne, he taught at Kenyon College. His book The Green Crusade: Rethinking the Roots of Environmentalism (1994) is a critical look at key figures of the environmental movement, including Rachel Carson, Barry Commoner, and Paul Ehrlich. In 2000 he published an edited collection of essays titled Conservation Reconsidered: Nature, Virtue and American Liberal Democracy, containing fresh looks at key figures in the conservation movement and those who influenced them.  Since then he has published essays on a variety of topics at the intersection of science, public policy and political philosophy, e.g., the problem of global climate change, the difficulty of applying the precautionary principle to measures dealing with Earth/asteroid collisions, conceptual flaws in the scientific search for extraterrestrial intelligence. He has also written about literary figures ranging from Henry Adams and Flannery O’Connor to Neal Stephenson and Karl Cepak. His Eclipse of Man: Human Extinction and the Meaning of Progress (2014) is a critical look at advocates of redesigning human beings. He received his BA in Political Science and Philosophy from Case-Western Reserve University, and his PhD from Boston College.


Fernando Simón Yarza, 2014-15 Visiting Fellow, is Assistant Professor of Constitutional Law at the University of Navarra, Spain. He has been Visiting Researcher at Wilhelm-Westäfllische Universität Münster and Visiting Scholar at Boston University. His research interests have been focused on the connection between constitutional rights and environmental care, the historical evolution of the principle of equality in Europe, the role of religious symbols in the public sphere, and the rules governing the composition of Constitutional Courts. His essays have been published in the main Spanish constitutional law journals. He received his law degree and his PhD from the University of Navarra. His doctoral thesis was awarded the Faculty Doctorate Prize and the prestigious Tomás y Valiente Prize, given by the Center for Political and Constitutional Studies and the Constitutional Court of Spain. In 2012 it was copublished by both institutions with the title Medio ambiente y derechos fundamentales.


Alejandra Vanney, 2014-15 William E. Simon Fellow in Religion and Public Life, is Professor of Political Science at Austral University in Buenos Aires, where she teaches political science and history of political thought. She was awarded a postdoctoral scholarship from CONICET (National Scientific and Technical Research Council, Argentina) and a postdoctoral research scholarship from the University of Navarra in Spain. Her main research interests include reason and revelation; law, politics and religion in civil society; political theology; and freedom and democracy. She published six books, nine chapters of books, and many articles in academic journals. She holds a MA in European Studies from Warsaw University/ Maastricht University, a LLM from Warsaw University, an MA in European Integration from Warsaw University/École Nationale d’Administration, and an MA in Government and Culture of the Organizations and a PhD in Philosophy from University of Navarra.





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