Policies and Endorsements

University Building Fire Safety and Security 
Guiding Principles and Standards


Guiding Principles
  1. All University buildings will comply with relevant fire code regulations and applicable state laws or have approved variances.
  2. All University academic and administrative buildings should have a combination of physical and electronic fire safety and security systems commensurate with the risks they pose.   To the extent possible, University fire safety and security measures above what is required by state or federal law or regulation should be standardized across categories of similar buildings, using a combination of factors such as: construction type, occupancy factors, content value or potential hazard, and mission criticality. 
  3. The installation, maintenance and upgrading of fire safety and security systems designed to meet University standards is an institutional responsibility. The priorities for upgrading are: life safety, mission critical; high hazard; irreplaceable contents; and preservation of heritage. 
  4. Fire safety and security system needs must be evaluated during the planning phase of all construction projects.  All new construction and major renovation projects should incorporate all physical and electronic fire safety and security measures established in the University standard and include an evaluation of the need for higher levels of interior fire safety and security based on intended occupancy or use.  Proposed construction or renovation projects involving certain highly specialized operations (e.g. involving high value art, rare books and manuscripts, etc.) may require the use of a consultant during the design phase.
  5. All occupants of academic and administrative buildings should be trained in basic fire safety and security awareness.
  6. Faculty, staff, students, and visitors should be expected to fully comply with all University fire safety, building evacuation, security and key control policies.
  7. Public Safety should be the first responder for all fire and security alarms and be capable of responding to alarms and problem conditions within a reasonable time.
The University should work towards being able to achieve the following standards: 

System Standards

University Residences:
I. Dormitories:

A. Fire Safety Standard
  1. Addressable fire detection system
  2. Emergency evacuation room posting
B. Security Standard
  1. Entrance doors must be equipped with access control card readers, electric locks, and intrusion/propped door sensors.
  2. All entry doors, frames, window panes and locks on the building perimeter must be resistant to forcible entry
  3. Accessible windows must be equipped with burglar resistant window screens. 
II. Other University residences - Low Rise: (less than 75 feet above grade)
    A. Fire Safety Standard 
    1. Hard wired smoke detectors (unsupervised)
    2. Common areas with upgradeable addressable systems
    3. Suppression in buildings over two stories 
    B. Security Standard
    1. Accessible windows must be equipped with burglar resistant window screens.
    2. All entry doors, frames, windows and locks resistant to forcible entry
III. Other University residences - High Rise: (75 feet or more above grade)
    A. Fire Safety Standard
    1. Hard wired smoke detectors in apartments (unsupervised)
    2. Common areas with upgraded addressable fire detection systems
    3. Suppression
    B. Security Standard
    1. Accessible windows must be equipped with burglar resistant window screens.
    2. All entry doors, frames, windows and locks resistant to forcible entry
IV. University academic and administrative buildings less than 10,000 square feet or “temporary” office stock
    A. Fire Safety:
    1. If occupancy is more than 3 stories, manual pull stations
    2. Hard wired smoke detectors


    B. Security Standard: 

    1. Accessible windows should be equipped with burglar resistant window screens
    2. All entry doors, frames, windows and locks resistant to forcible entry
V. All other academic and administrative buildings:
    A. Building Fire Safety standard:
    1. Manual pull stations to alert occupants of an emergency
    2. Emergency lighting tied to generators
    3. Addressable fire detection system 
    B. Exterior Security Standard:
    1. Entrance doors should be equipped with access control card readers, electric locks, and intrusion/propped door sensors.   Receiving docks are considered entrances.
    2. Any utility opening greater than 10 inches square that an intruder could use to enter and exit the building should have effective security barriers and be equipped with appropriate intrusion alarm sensors.
    3. All entry doors, windows, and locks must be resistant to forced entry.   The doors must be able to close and lock from the outside and provide emergency egress from the inside. 
    4. Accessible windows should be equipped with burglar resistant window screens.


    C. Interior Room Standards

    1. Fire Safety - for moderate risk areas (1)
      1. Appropriate suppression (sprinklers, clean agent gas systems, etc.)
    2. Interior Security - for spaces designated as security protection level 2 (SPL2 - moderate risk areas containing equipment or material that could be misused and threatening to the public; or that contain mission critical equipment or material; or for rare books and fine arts)
      1. i. Areas should be separate from the public areas of the building
        ii. Electronic access control with intrusion/propped door sensors that maintain an entry transaction history on all authorized users.
        iii. All entry doors and emergency exits must have high security, industrial grade, tamper resistant, locks and non-duplicatable key cores. 
        iv. All areas must be equipped with an industry grade intrusion alarm system, that, at a minimum, is activated after normal operating hours, with sensors for doors, windows and other operable openings.  Area (trap) motion detectors must be strategically positioned.   All devices and signals should be on electronically protected and supervised circuits reporting to Public Safety.


Operational Standards

I. Public Safety: 

  1. Public Safety should be able to respond within 3 minutes of receiving a building fire alarm signal. 
  2. Public Safety should be able to respond within 10 minutes of receiving a security alarm signal.
  3. Public Safety patrols of SPL2 locations should be a minimum of 2 tours per night shift.
  4. Public Safety should periodically patrol and inspect building perimeters for unsecured windows.
II. Facilities: 
  1. All fire detection and suppression systems, security systems, building exterior doors, and all moderate security risk (SPL2) facilities must be inspected and serviced at appropriate intervals, no less than annually, except where explicitly permitted by law. 
  2. Facilities should repair all fire safety systems and equipment, exterior doors and security system devices as a top priority and should report back to Public Safety on a timely basis the status of all work orders reflecting maintenance, repair or upgrades.
  3. Access for routine cleaning, maintenance and repairs in SPL2 areas is to be limited to hours when departmental personnel are present.
Responsibilities 

I. Public Safety:

  1. Public Safety is responsible for operational oversight of all electronic fire and security alarm systems and notifying Facilities whenever systems need repair or need to be upgraded.
  2. In collaboration with Facilities, Public Safety will review and certify that the fire safety and security plans submitted by Project Managers conform to these standards.
  3. Public Safety will provide fire safety and security awareness training to building occupants.
II. Facilities:
  1. Facilities is responsible for oversight of fire suppression systems and keys.
  2. Project managers for building renovation or construction projects must ensure conformance with these standards by submitting plans and obtaining design approval from Facilities and Public Safety during the construction documentation and code review phases of project planning. 
  3. In collaboration with Public Safety, Facilities will review and certify that the fire safety and security plans submitted by Project Managers conform to these standards
III. ESRM fire safety/security subcommittee:
  1. The President has delegated the authority to determine University policy and guidelines for campus wide environmental, safety and risk management issues to the ESRM Committee.   As such, the ESRM is the body responsible for setting policy and guidelines relating to fire safety and security. 
    Annually, the ESRM will review the status of all pending fire safety and security improvements and agree upon priorities.   The ESRM will forward their recommendations to the Vice President for Facilities and the Facilities Planning Group.   The Facilities Planning Group will integrate these recommendations with other capital needs and will incorporate logistical impacts (i.e., the impact these improvements will have on the academic program in a given building) as they determine the final slate of improvements and timeline in the overall capital planning process.
2. At the end of each year, a status report will be presented to the Trustee Audit Committee. 
IV. Occupying Department(s):
  1. Ensure windows are closed and locked after normal operating hours.
  2. Ensure SPL2 areas are secured after normal operating hours.
  3. Maintain effective key management policies and procedures
  4. Ensure occupants are trained in fire safety and security awareness


(1) Fire safety moderate risk areas are defined as:

Life safety hazard spaces
Spaces where occupants may require assistance to evacuate promptly during an emergency such as:

  • Areas occupied by young children
  • Medical patients or others with mobility impairments
Serveries or kitchens in buildings where students sleep.
Large assembly areas as appropriate. 

Mission critical spaces
Operations where disruption or extended downtime would significantly affect the ability of the University or an individual department to function normally such as: 

  • telephone switches, networks or computer equipment serving multiple departments
  • Laboratory or other spaces with high concentrations of valuable equipment serving multiple users
High hazard spaces
Areas containing large quantities of hazardous material or equipment with significant potential for fire or other catastrophic event such as:
  • Laboratory or other spaces with high flammable or combustible loading
  • Highly toxic gas storage areas (e.g. semiconductor gases)
  • Areas containing high voltage electrical equipment or class IV lasers
High value or irreplaceable contents 
  • fine arts collections
  • rare books
  • concentrations of high value research or other instrumentation 
Preservation of heritage
Buildings with historical significance as defined by Physical Planning 
 
Endorsed by ESRM April 1, 2003


Last Updated 4/11/02